3 Industry Insights on the Impact of the Internet of Things on the Critical Power Industry

The global trend of big data and the Internet of Things (IoT) drives the need for robust, resilient power supply systems, as critical infrastructures and facilities increasingly rely on big data for their operation. This offers great opportunity for the industry as these systems will need to be supported by critical power technology. However, how does the industry itself predict the impact of the IoT will have on critical facilities, their design, and critical power technology?

We put the question to each layer in the supply chain and these were their responses:


 "Artificial intelligence coupled with individual user data will result in a much more personalized service and convenience of use"

Ford health systemThe end-user: the IoT will continue to develop in complexity and automation. The implementation of artificial intelligence coupled with individual user data will result in a much more personalized service and convenience of use. These systems will start to predict what assistance is needed and will proactively offer to help. This coupled with robotics will mean the assistance will go beyond information and into physical work getting done. (Brian Wezensky, Data Center Engineer, Henry Ford Health System)

 

"The hub and spoke systems we have will look like a lot more hubs, less like a wheel, and more like the continuous industrial product"

VanderweilThe design engineer: I read a book a few years ago called the Second Machine Age. It discusses how people fear job loss in the age of technology advances all the way back to the steam engine. But time and time again more jobs are created with the advances. It’s no secret that data centers are bigger and denser than they were even 5-years ago. All these devices? All that data? It lives someplace that will probably be managed by robots. But real people build those sites, supply product for them, lease them, and give the robots tune ups. I think the edge will get bigger and start to scale with colo. The hub and spoke systems we have will look like a lot more hubs, less like a wheel, and more like the continuous industrial product that a data center and its associated network is. (Christopher McLean, Director, Mission Critical Projects, Vanderweil Engineers)

 

"Availability of data and remote control capability enhances system reliability and usefulness… However, is highly prone to security challenges that cannot be ignored"

RhombusThe equipment supplier: The IoT is a rapidly evolving field which is already reshaping many areas such as operations, logistics, and manufacturing. It is now poised to bring a revolution in the energy storage market as well. This technology has a potential to reduce the cost of owning energy storage assets through resource optimization and management. Availability of data and remote control capability enhances system reliability and usefulness.

At Rhombus, we continue to develop IoT features such as remote communications and controls of inverter functions; intermediary controls for energy management, monitoring and reporting of the “state of energy” of system resources. Industrial IoT (IIoT), however, is highly prone to security challenges that cannot be ignored. This aspect shall be addressed in the Smart Grid Framework to minimize the hacking and sabotage by unwanted entities. (Anil Tuladhar, VP of Engineering, Rhombus Energy)


Keen to find out more on industry trends and innovations in critical power system design and technology?

Register for FREE to attend Buyers Forum @ Critical Power Expo and meet renowned industry experts from leading companies such as AECOM, CH2M Hill and T-Mobile, and many others!

 

Register for a free conference pass

spacer